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‘Orange is the New Black’ Attention Grabbing Head-Line

17 Jul

(Just a note: the following post contains spoilers pertaining to the first two seasons of Orange is the New Black)

This morning, my friend showed me an interesting article titled Orange is the New Black‘s Irresponsible Portrayal of Men. I quickly realized that the reason this article seemed familiar was because I had seen it online before-but in a very different context. I had seen excerpts from the first part of the article, arguing that there needs to be more male representation in the show, and the comments that followed were incredulous and indignant. After seeing just that much, I agreed with them. Once I read the entire article though, I see that the argument is a bit more nuanced than it was portrayed to be.

The author (Noah Berlatsky) opens by recognizing how his complaint could be construed; in a media world where women are portrayed less/worse than men, attacking an amazingly female inclusive show for not portraying men sounds laughably petty. He makes a good point of pointing out that his problem is not with the amount of men portrayed on the show, but how the few men on the show are portrayed. The example the author focuses on is the male prisoner from the beginning of season 2, and it is implied that because he is the only male prisoner focused on, he represents all male prisoner portrayal as “violent”, “abusive”, and “repulsive”. This is clear when the author writes,

“According to Orange Is the New Black, though, men in prison are “super-predators” while women in prison are, often, innocent victims, doomed by circumstances and their own painful but touching character flaws.”

However, I have to disagree with this point and the rather sweeping generalizations that follow. The male prisoner previously mentioned is first shown in a scene where a group of male prisoners board a plane; the first interaction between the female and male prisoners (after the women whistle and cat-call) is an amicable and sincere greeting between two friends who recognize each other. The only “deviant” and “dangerous” seeming man is the one who the main character, Piper, later speaks to. As the men sit on the plane, they overall seem rather tame, besides a few teases that could be interpreted as taunts thrown amongst each other (but there is a silent prisoner with a Nazi symbol tattooed on his forehead). These male prisoners are the only male prisoners ever seen/portrayed on the show. As the show does take place in a female prison, that is pretty reasonable. While I definitely agree that stereotypical portrayals of men are harmful, the author continuously uses the same male prisoner as an example of how all men on the show are treated. It feels a bit like grasping at straws.

The majority of the other men on the show are men in positions of authority; correctional officers and their supervisors (as well as various inmates significant others, like Larry, Piper’s ex-fiance). Agreed, these men are overall portrayed in a negative way, from slimy to power-abusing to homophobic. While I do think that these characters are included to show corruption in the legal system (including the female assistant warden, who swindles money from the prison), I can see how them mostly being male and portrayed in a harmful light can be problematic. The problem is moderately alleviated in the second season, where they become more nuanced and complex, but it can still be a general consensus that they are overall bad people. Piper’s counselor, Mr. Healey, was first shown as a generally well-meaning guy, even though he did favor Piper because of her education and up-bringing in contrast to his usual prisoners. However he is revealed to be extremely homophobic, rather controlling, and looks the other way when an inmate tries to murder Piper. The slimiest male guard, nick-named Pornstache, shows a bit of a softer side when he allegedly falls in love with a female inmate (when it’s actually closer to idealization) and willingly goes to jail for her, despite how in the first season he was smuggling drugs in exchange for sex. A response I’ve seen to this is when people say ‘now men knows what it feels like to have limited, often grossly exaggerated representations of themselves in television’. While this is true, I can only really see this as a temporary solution. In the case of men catcalling to women, it does not create equality when women start catcalling to men; it is merely prolonging the problem. There could be more varied portrayals of men in the show; however with the limited room to put more male characters in, I don’t really see how that can happen after you count the few good male characters like the guard Bennett and Piper’s brother.

The next main point Berlatsky brings up is how the women on the show, with the aid of their ‘melodramatic’ back-stories, are portrayed as victims of the system who deserve sympathy and recognition of their ‘innocence’. I can agree that with the way the show frames the stories of the main characters, the goal is certainly to get them in the viewer’s good graces. But I don’t think the intention of fleshing out the prisoners is to show that they are innocent, or that heart driven weaknesses led them to prison. I think it’s to show that while bad people can do bad things, good people can also do bad things. A point I continuously try to advocate is that no one is as bad or as good as they are made out to be; we generalize and polarize to neatly organize people into ‘good’ and ‘evil’. People are too multi-faceted to be divided in such a way, and there are really only varying degrees of good and bad, and everything in between. The show portrays prisoners who got locked away for a one-time mistake, it portrays prisoners who knowingly did bad things because of their circumstances, and it portrays rather awful, manipulative prisoners who are selfish and controlling. It is actually surprising to me how with a show full of diverse women, the article still manages to generalize ‘female’ portrayal into one category.

There are female inmates on the show who are capable of doing awful things, and who are not in prison because of ‘bad luck’ and “individual sadnesses”. The author even mentions Vee, the “sociopathic new villain”, but quickly dismisses her as an exception. However, the male prisoner he focused on before had a small sliver of screen-time compared to Vee, and there are actually quite a few similarities between the two characters, which the author didn’t recognize. The male prisoner was described as repulsive and deviant, whereas Vee adopted children to put into her drug business. When one of her adopted ‘sons’ betrays her, she sleeps with him and then has him murdered. I would describe that as repulsive and deviant. She is not the only example of how the female prisoners aren’t innocent, though. Morello is an inmate who constantly gushes about her wonderful fiance and the marriage she is planning for. In season 2, it is revealed that they went on only one date, and along with credit card fraud she also stalked him/fictionalized their entire relationship. By revealing the troubling backstory to an initial sweetheart, the message didn’t seem to say ‘you should excuse all her actions because we showed you what a sweetheart she is’. Even her friend in the show comforted her by acknowledging her problems and saying that she can still be loved despite them. It seems more like a message that all human beings have flaws, and do bad/wrong things, but that doesn’t mean that we are permanently undeserving of love. This is a show that focuses on the hearts and souls of human beings, and less on systematic injustices, like Berlatsky says. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though.

The article, while it seems to be primarily about the television show, sandwiches a lot of commentary about violence against men and how it is ignored because women aren’t taken seriously as violent aggressors. This, I am behind 1000%. Abuse and violence are very serious things, and it is true that when women attack/hurt men, it is usually not taken as seriously as when it is the other way around.

However, the article originally posted by the author apparently received a lot of criticism, enough so that it warranted a follow-up article where the author brings in a second opinion, from author Adam Jones. This article barely comments on Orange is the New Black, and focuses on problems within the structure of female activists and male activists. It expands on the bigger issues touched on in the first article and brings them to the focus. But after reading this second article, it kind of felt to me that these were the main issues the author wanted to discuss in the first place. He stuck it in the middle of commentary about OITNB, and in doing so it felt to me that he used the show as a catalyst to point out important issues that aren’t exactly related to the show at all. It is absolutely true that in society, women aren’t seen as being capable of violence to the same degree as men. I’m glad that the author addresses stereotypes like that. But I’m not really sure how these important issues tie completely in with the show, since we often see women physically fighting each other and plotting violent deeds.

I’m not afraid to admit that I am a big fan of OITNB. But I have a feeling that someone could read this post and immediately dismiss it as ‘a feminist fangirl who blindly defends OITNB because of gender-related favoritism’. I would never claim that OITNB is a perfect show, because it’s not; like any piece of media, it has flaws and will never satisfy every viewer for every issue. But in this particular circumstance, I feel that it was receiving unjust criticism based on issues beyond it, because it had the gall to focus on women first and foremost. This post isn’t an in-depth commentary on the stereotypes and discriminations faced by both genders on an international and historical basis. I’ve been meaning to write about the show lately, and this is just a summation of my thoughts on a flawed show that is doing a pretty good job of portraying the human condition, while adding in commentary on the legal system. I applaud Berlatsky for addressing issues that others tend to shy away from, but I urge him to recognize more concise ways to address the issues instead of wrapping them in trendy packages that attract viewers.

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Movie Review: Bachelorette

20 Jan

I’m not gonna lie; I’ve been very unproductive with my time lately. School has started but the workload hasn’t kicked off yet, and with my new-found obsession with Adam Scott, I thought, ‘you know what I’m going to do? I’m gonna watch every movie Adam Scott’s been in that’s available on Netflix’. So far I’ve gotten through two, and in order to give me the slightest, false sense of productivity, I’ve decided to write a completely random compilation of my thoughts. Note that I’m in no way an experienced reviewer or have the slightest idea of what I’m talking about.

Via wikipedia.org

The first movie I watched is called Bachelorette, and it has quite an all-star cast backing it up. That doesn’t mean, however, that a film will instantly be fantastic. To give it a straight up, numerical rating, I would say the film is 3/5 stars (and that could even be a bit generous). The movie is set up as a fast-paced adventure; a crazy stupid thing leads to a million other crazy things to keep the plot going quickly, and ideally there’d be enough characterization pieced in that by the end everything has been fleshed out and amazingly delivered.

A brief synopsis is that Becky (Rebel Wilson) is getting married, and her three high school friends are a bit jealous that their ‘fat friend’ is getting married before them. After a small attempt at a Bachelorette party in a hotel room goes awry, the three friends Regan (Kirsten Dunst), Katie (Isla Fisher), and Gena (Lizzy Caplan) get high and accidentally rip the bride’s wedding dress. They then spend their night trying to repair it while occasionally interacting with the men at the groom’s Bachelor’s Party. The movie ends with a relatively saved wedding and new-found, or rekindled, romances for each of the girls.

The plot certainly does keep it going, and a lot of crazy things happen one after another, but that isn’t enough to make the movie fantastic. In the beginning we see the three women not reacting very warmly to Becky getting married soon, and it paints the picture that she in the odd one out in the group of ‘popular girls’, as they were all friends in high school. By the end, there is no development on this; we only ever see a friendship between Regan, the perceived head-b* in charge, and Becky. Becky barely even interacts with her other two so-called friends.

The romances that develop are sweet, but again there isn’t enough characterization to make me feel like they were anything other than rushed. The only one that felt a bit more developed was with Katie, the ‘ditz’ of the group, who doesn’t know how to pursue men in non-sexual ways. The guy who has a crush on her refuses to sleep with her while she was high/drunk, because he wants it to mean something. By the end, she agrees to try a relationship in a genuine manner, and they really do seem sweet together.

The romance between Gena and her ex-high school sweetheart (Adam Scott) is a tad messier. Gena got an abortion when she was younger (he was the father), and they ceased contact because he didn’t go with her to the clinic when she needed him. The big dramatic turning point was just that he admitted he was ‘too sad’ to go with her, and then in a fit of passion they have sex. Then at the wedding he admits that he loves her and wants to be with her, and that is their ‘big happy ending’. I’m sure they had much to discuss off screen about real issues and lingering hurt, but the problem with focusing on too many storylines is that you can’t properly focus on all of them. I’m not saying you have to hand things to your viewers, but that’s also not an excuse to under-develop your character’s stories.

The last romance, with Regan, is the most implied and subtle of the three. She has one relatively deep conversation with a guy who is a complete douchebag for the entire movie, and at the end there is a slight possibility that they will date. The guy (James Marsden’s character) is too much of a jerk for one deep thought to redeem his character, and there was definitely not enough time spent on their relationship for me to really care if they eventually get together.

The girls themselves are reasonably fleshed out, but more as archetypes than three-dimensional people. You’ve got a strong leader, a sarcastic rebel, a ditzy party girl, and a bullied, nice ‘fat girl’. They do each come out of their boxes a little, but again, it wasn’t enough for me. I realize I’ve been focusing more on the characters then the overall story, but I think the characters can make or break a movie.

Don’t get me wrong; Bachelorette is funny at times, but also offensive at times, and slightly over-the-top at times. I do think that the actors and actresses do a great job, but the way the story is framed and written is what detracts from that. Overall, I’d say it’s enjoyable if you don’t want to look too hard into it, as long as you promise to not try and take any life-lessons from it. Or if you want to stare at Adam Scott’s face for the, I’d say, 20 minutes he’s on screen. That’s always a good enough reason.

 

Also I realize that this movie is several years old, but as I said this review is kind of selfish in that it’s just a way for me to process my thoughts rather than attract views. But speaking of views, I hit 30,000 views several months ago and kept forgetting to mention it! I can’t thank my followers and even random passerby’s enough, it really is incredible that people have been reading these random thoughts I’ve been peddling out for nearly three, crazy years now. All my love; thank you thank you thank you.

LGGT Glee?

13 Nov

Glee can be silly at times, it can be stupid at times, and it can be wrong at times-but even knowing that, I am sometimes still shocked by some of the things the characters say on that show, and get away with. Obviously characters are dynamic and not perfect, so it’s not a reflection of the writers when they say offensive things; but when the characters are not portrayed in a negative light because of what they said, or no one points out what was wrong with it, it comes across as an okay thing to state.

Glee has always been known to have a pretty harsh view towards bisexuality; an openly gay student (Kurt) stated that it was merely a transitional phase for gay students too afraid to come out fully, and was never corrected. Brittany, the first and only bi character on the show, was never fleshed out fully and her sexuality was more of a plot device than character development. But I was beyond appalled by the second episode of this newest season, 5, and more than that, I was appalled by the lack of response to it I saw in the general community.

In the episode, several comments were thrown around about bisexuality when Santana mentioned her past girlfriend, Brittany. This included her love interest stating how she thinks Santana could use a “100%…goddess”; so are bisexuals incapable of being in same-sex relationships because they are not ‘100%’ gay? Not a minute later, Santana states how nervous the new girl makes her, because she’s only ever been with bisexuals or girls looking for a fun experiment; note how bisexuals are compared to people exploring their sexuality or even just looking for a fun fling. It’s heavily implied that being with a lesbian will be the real deal, a stronger type of relationship, than one that could ever be possible with a bisexual.

Via zazzle.com

For those of you who know of Tumblr, you know how fans enjoy practically tearing the show apart whenever they find something dis-satisfactory or offensive (a gross generalization, I know). So I was surprised when all the negative stigmas Glee was portraying towards bisexuality were not even mentioned; I saw not a single post addressing this issue.

I thought the offensive bisexual stuff was over with long ago, but I was disappointed with how none of the things the characters stated were ever contradicted or addressed. Glee just has an overall offensive and superior view towards bisexuals, and I’m really disgruntled by how few people have commented on this.

Straight Until Proven Gay

18 Aug

The other day I was sitting on the couch with my mom when she turned to me and said, completely out of the blue, “Is your friend gay?”

I was extremely taken aback but without hesitation I replied, “Yes…”. She followed it up with, “Does he have a boyfriend?”, to which I responded no. She then asked me this:

“Then how does he know he’s gay?”

I smiled a bit (although I don’t think she realized it was a bitter smile) and responded as boldly as I dared. “No one ever says that to straight people.”

I’ve been meaning to write this blog post for a very long time. The idea struck me right around when I was re-watching season 1 of Glee, when I realized just how problematic one of the things Sue says is. She tries to lecture Kurt on sexuality when he claims that he is gay, and one of the things she says is, “You see, that’s the problem with your generation. You’re obsessed with labels.”

via netflix.com

Screen-cap via netflix.com

The problem I had with her speech was that that line is very true. Many people are obsessed with labels, and it’s not beneficial for all of the different shades of gender and sexuality that exist out there. But the fact that the line was included in her ‘speech’ gave the impression that everything else she was saying is also true. Here’s what I want to know. Does Sue walk around her high school every day and find straight couples making out, and say the same thing to them? Did she ever reprimand Quinn for her boyfriend, because she’s never kissed a girl and therefore can’t be sure she’s not a lesbian?

The core of the advice, don’t be too quick to judge, is lost in the fact that the only person Sue decides to tell this to is the one kid who dares to claim that he’s gay. Sure, 16 years might be too young to decide on sexuality (for some, not all). But you know it’s complete BS when people only decide to share this ‘wealth of knowledge’ with people who have decided on any sexuality that deviates from the norm, which is heterosexuality. Apparently you’re only allowed to “not know what you are” if you want to be anything other than straight.

And the other point she tries to bring up is how someone could know that they’re gay if they’ve never kissed someone of the same sex. Bypassing the obvious (which again is, no one ever says this to straight people) this kind of ideology just doesn’t make sense to me. Sexuality isn’t the same thing as, for example, saying you don’t like a meal before you’ve even tasted it. People have eyes. It’s insulting to tell someone that they can’t know who they’re attracted to until they’ve had some sort of physical, sexual interaction with them.

The bottom line? It’s no one’s place to decide or even make statements on another person’s sexuality or preferences. It’s a personal decision. If you think they’ve ‘chosen wrong’, it’s not your place to comment on it. They will figure it out on their own and experience that journey themselves.

Thoughts Regarding Cory Monteith

15 Jul

This post is going to address the passing of Cory Monteith and my feelings about it; I know the topic is very sensitive still so please read with your own discretion. This blog has always been about venting my own emotions, never just commenting on recent events to get more views, so as a huge fan of Glee this post is likely to be all over the place.

As others have said before over and over again, it just doesn’t feel real. I’ve read about his death and I’ve seen the phrase “rip cory” probably hundreds of times by now, but the lasting implications of what that means is just impossible for me to grasp right now. I’ve gotten used to thinking, oh, he’s dead, but does that mean that from a week from now, he’ll still be dead? A year from now, still dead. Fifty years from now, still forever known as 31 years old, never to have married or had kids or become an even bigger star. The fact that he will forever and always be trapped in this week is inconceivable right now. And as this is my first glimpse of grief, I guess this is just a normal phase. If I think about the finality and truth of the situation, I break down. Just like I did when I found out, while still in a cloud of my dazed shock and disbelief.

And that might be another thing people have trouble with. Why am I so devastated? Well to anyone who may have been teased or met confusion for sobbing over a celebrity, here’s the thing. It’s okay to be upset. Being sad for a week or even month may seem ‘reserved’ for people you actually know, but celebrities and idols are people who are loved and adored. Just because they are a celebrity and you are a fan doesn’t mean that there’s a rift in the universe where you aren’t both just humans. There has been an actual death concerning an actual person. There are losses and we all feel them. We feel for his family, his friends, and his girlfriend. We feel for his work, his passions, his achievements, his sense of lighthearted humor, and his love of life. Gleeks, we are a family and we have lost one of our own. It’s okay to just not be okay right now, because he’s not just an actor.

To any of my irl friends who didn’t know yet, I have been devastated by the news since I heard yesterday afternoon. I’ll probably be depressed for a couple of weeks at the least as the truth of it really sinks in, and yes I’ll feel this way because a celebrity died. He was young and he had a wonderful life full of opportunities to live. But now all I can hope is that where he is now is at least as wonderful as he is.

By it’s very definition, glee is about opening yourself up to joy

10 Dec

In the interest of writing about Glee for academic purposes, I decided to write a short blog post to gather my thoughts about that insufferable show, its addicting qualities, and why, at the end of the day, I’m still hopelessly in love with it.

Well…where do I begin? Perhaps with what drew me in at the very beginning-the love. The show starts out with a group of kids who are all completely different, from different interests and social “cliques”; they don’t even share a common love for music at first. But by the end of  even the first season, they realize that all of them have similar problems and feelings, and that they’re each important. They acknowledge that they’re not so different after all, and become friends despite what their school and society is telling them about right and wrong. And mostly, they rise up against shunning from everyone, and decided that hey, maybe this stupid glee club is worth so much more than superficial high school life could ever be. It’s a bit like The Breakfast Club, with a lot more music and melodrama.

But what really gets me is the raw emotion of the show. When Kurt’s dad is in the hospital and he sings a solo at Glee club about it, I cried along with his friends. When Quinn gets pregnant and she cries as her father kicks her out the house, I feel as much anger and indignation as her boyfriend. When the glee club belts out the last note of Don’t Stop Believing at Regional’s to represent where they started and where there are now, my heart soars alongside theirs.

Glee may be a comedy, if you want to look at technicalities. And the humor is a glorious part of the show as well-it keeps things light and refreshing, and is the perfect compliment to all the pathos going on. But at the end of the day, every time I turn back to Glee, it’s because it lays everything bare and simple. Humans, being humans, making human mistakes, and feeling human emotions. A group of kids, coming together against all odds and creating a family for themselves, shaped out of nothing but pure love.

Glee may include a lot of things-unnecessary drama, bad characterization, and cheap plot thrills, to name a few. But every time I watch a group number where all the theatricality is laid aside, and they’re simply doing what they love-singing together and feeling pure joy-I feel the exact same thing.

Pure joy.

Glee Review – Dynamic Duets (And Blaine/Kurt Commentary)

23 Nov

Let me just start by saying that there’s always some good and bad aspects of every Glee episode-but by gosh, this one had twice as many hits than misses compared to the rest. It was funny and ridiculous and adorable and stupid and over-the-top, and…perfectly imperfect.

The episode opened up with one of the lightest and most comedic aspects of Glee we haven’t seen in a LONG time, and goodness was it refreshing. The superhero club has apparently gained much popularity at McKinley and the leader, Blaine, (sorry, sorry-Nightbird) helped everyone really get into character. The entire opening was filled with funny one-liners (despite a quick stab in the heart for klainers everywhere), culminating with a dramatic video from the Warblers.

Next we see Finn trying to spearhead the Glee club, and miserably failing, while sass-master Blaine decides that he’s going to head off to get the stolen Nationals trophy back from the Warblers. For the few out there, fan-girl squeals could not be contained at the reappearance of Sebastian (Grant is back!). The Warblers reveal that they want Blaine back on their choir, and we learn that with Blaine, no means no, unless everyone around him starts singing back-up vocals for his inevitable solo. The entire Warbler scene was over-the-top hilarious and I just…I love Glee.

Alas, new-kid drama could not be avoided but like every episode has been proving so far, despite those Glee fans out there refusing to fall in love with all of the newbies, Ryan Murphy and his gang of writers prove that no one can resist their charming new characters. We learn that Ryder is dyslexic (so now he is apparently a complete mix of Finn and Sam) and Jake gets bullied for his mixed-race (by none other than Cookie from Ned’s Declassified…). Ryder and Jake, and Kitty and Marley, seem to be on much better terms by the end of the episode, and all of them seem to genuinely like each other except for Kitty. That chick is hiding something, and there better be a good reason for why she’s being such a manipulative jerk to Marley (the writers have been known for making girl characters mean to each other for stupid, petty reasons). Also both of the new-kid duets were spectacular! Darn you, RIB!

Finally, we reach the Blaine/Klaine drama. Sigh. Here’s where I shall announce that this aspect of the show made me a little upset. You should probably know that I’m a Kurt-staner. Living on internet filled with Blaine-staners. So I tend to get frustrated by most of the other opinions I see online. You see, this episode shows Blaine’s side of the story. He cheated on Kurt (yes, to you hopefuls out there, he DID sleep with Eli, not just make-out or something) and he’s been beating himself up this entire time, and wants to transfer to Dalton because he feels more welcome there. After hearing his story, Sam comforts Blaine by basically saying something along the lines of ‘You messed up, but you’re not a bad person. You’re one of the good guys.’ While I don’t think that Blaine is a terrible person either, and that one mistake defines a person, I still can’t forgive him that easily yet. I just don’t feel comfortable doing that. The show is mostly from Blaine’s aspect right now, not Kurt’s, because of the school being the central point of the show. Because of that, we’re only seeing how sad and guilty Blaine has been feeling, and he looks kind of like a sad puppy dog-adorable and heartbreaking. But just because Blaine feels bad about cheating doesn’t mean that it didn’t happen. It doesn’t mean that he didn’t throw away his relationship and shatter the trust they had because of his own insecurities and loneliness. And when I see people going “poor baby Blaine” all the time, now even on the show itself, it irks me a little bit because he. still. cheated. I’m not saying I’ll never forgive him, but I’m going to need a little bit more redemption other than “look how sad and heartbroken and guilty baby Blaine feels”. And that redemption obviously has to involve Kurt; I don’t know about you guys, but I wouldn’t mind some groveling for forgiveness on Blaine’s part!

Just on the break-up story line in general; it kind of made me sad. Not because of klaine, but because of the blatant favoritism that made itself apparent after it happened. Because guess what-if Kurt has cheated on Blaine, people would have lost their minds. They would have spent weeks blaming Kurt for making Blaine sad. They would have pitied Blaine. But even when Blaine is the one who cheated-they still pity Blaine.

I love Kurt and Blaine, don’t get me wrong-but I think cheating is a very serious offense when it comes to relationships. It’s going to take time to build from that, and  to earn forgiveness for Blaine-I just hope that others will consider this too (even you, Sam!).

But to break up the angst, there were a few key moments that screamed pure Glee, by it’s actual definition-joy. The painting scene-it made me want to curl up into a ball and scream (the happy kind of screaming, that is). The moment when Blaine and Sam stole the trophy back; unfortunately my mom was the room when it happened, but if I had been alone I would have cried from how perfect it was and how happy it made me. And the ending performance. I don’t know if they freaking purposely did the outfit parallelism between Some Nights and the pilot rendition of Don’t Stop Believing (red shirts and all), but it was ridiculously nostalgic and heart-warming and oh gosh, when Glee does group numbers, IT FREAKING BLOWS YOUR EMOTIONS OUT OF THE WATER.

Few more little things:

Finn was adorable. I remembered why I like him, even though he can be ridiculously offensive and hurtful at times.

Puck is back! And doling out such-ahem-most insightful advice to his half-brother Jake.

Tina is the voice of the entire fandom-by the way, I’m still frustrated that the new kids have been getting so many solos compared to her.

All of the music this episode was spectacular!

Eli had only like two lines, but one was frustratingly hilarious because everyone had been commenting on the lighthouse profile picture beforehand.

Kitty and Marley are hot-I smell a new “faberry”-esque ship beginning.

And it is now canon that Blaine smells like raspberries. That is all.

What did you guys think of the episode?? I’d love to hear your thoughts- let me know! Also sorry I haven’t written a post in a while. I suck, I know.