Tag Archives: katniss

The Hunger Games

1 Feb

I read the Hunger Games (the first book at least) about two years ago. It’s hard to not fall in love; the tragic story-lines, pulling suspense, and bittersweet romance are all blended perfectly in this dramatic book. And now there’s a movie coming out in a couple of months! Many fans are concerned with whether the movie will live up to the fans expectations; Hollywood seems to have a tendency to ruin things. But does it really? The magical thing about books is that the words the author gives you are the tools for your imagination. There’s no way a movie can live up to your expectations because every reader has created, and essentially read, a different story. The best a movie can do is to simply try to create a general “blanket” of a movie that covers as many peoples visions as possible.

Despite what you’ve imagined for the appearance or the mannerisms of each character, the cast has been chosen and can’t please everyone. It’s best to take what they give us and accept that whatever you see on the screen will not change the book in any way. Treat the movie as an enhancement to the book; the best it can do is deliver the same emotions experienced by the readers in a visually and audibly tangible way. Speaking of audio, who else has already experienced numerous emotions  just by listening to Taylor Swift’s new song “Safe and Sound”? It’s so haunting and soft and tragic! This song can give me chills and tears. I may have already listened to it 15 times…

I know that the movie won’t be perfect because that would be impossible. And yet I am filled with excitement and anxiousness as I await the release of the movie. I simply cannot wait! Even the trailer gave me goosebumps, which gives me hope for the movie. Just thinking about all the ways they can pair anguishing scenes with powerful music moves me. For lack of a better term, I hope the movie is ‘epic’.

The Problem With Fictional Deaths

27 Jul

Via cnbc.com

*WARNING: Spoilers for various books like Mockingjay, Forever, the Iron King, and Death Note*

I’ve always had a certain disbelief whenever I read a characters death in a book. Almost half of the time, it was just a close call and the character is suddenly back, arriving right at the height of a big moment. It adds suspense, but books (and movies) have done it so much that it’s ruined my ability to take a death seriously. I’m almost always convinced it was a trick or misunderstanding. In the book Forever (from the Mercy Falls series), I went a full chapter believing with full certainty that Cole St. Clair was not dead. I finally admitted that it could be possible when they went looking for his body; kind of a strange reaction since them not being able to find his body should reinforce the belief that he’s not dead. But I should have held on to my belief; Cole was revealed to be alive. I responded with relief AND excitement; perhaps a weird reaction for someone who’d known it all along.

The same happened in The Iron King; the Winter Prince Ash sacrificed himself for his love, Meghan. Except no one sees him die, since he tells Meghan to run while he fights back their enemies. Sure enough, Ash ends up being a prisoner to the enemy but fully alive. You can see why it’s hard to take any death seriously anymore. Which is a big problem, since now it hurts so much more when it isn’t a ploy. Instead of feeling the pain and grieving with the main character immediately after, we fill ourselves with disbelief and float through the next few chapters waiting to see when they will reveal themselves to be fine. When we slowly realize they’re actually dead, we have to cope with it during a random part of the story, after the other characters have already moved on.

A prime example of this is in Mockingjay, when Prim dies. That was more believable but still, there’s always a hope that she wasn’t caught in the bomb blast. We had to slowly realize that she was gone. And death note? I was COMPLETELY convinced that L was alive, he was just pulling a move on Light. I mean L, the greatest detective in the world, killed just like that? I had to ask my friend “Wait, he’s not really dead, right?” before I could even begin to believe it.

This just goes to show that “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” is right; authors have used this manipulative writing technique too many times for me.